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Add a Splash Of Color with the Orange Glory Butterfly Perennial for Zone 7

Orange Butterfly Plant

One of the toughest places to plant here in Zone 7 are those super hot and dry areas. With the crazy weather patterns around here it’s difficult to find great looking plants that can stand the hot and sometimes super dry summers. So it’s always awesome when you find something that not only works but looks great.

Today, we will talk about the Orange butterfly plant. Now don’t mistake this for a butterfly bush because they are not the same thing. The Orange butterfly plant is not a bush, rather it is a mid sized perennial with brilliant orange clusters of flowers that grace your garden most of the growing season. It takes full sun like an absolute champ. It doesn’t wilt and it doesn’t burn. It also does not need a whole lot of water either nor is it particularly picky about soil conditions. Another nice quality is that it will give you flowers the first year even if planted as a bare root perennial. In fact, my specimens came from Direct Gardening.

If you order this as a bareroot perennial, be ready to receive a strange looking tuber. It’s got lots of tendrils radiating from the main tuber body. If you order this for Direct Gardening, and you get a specimen with a little mold on the ends, don’t despair as it will not hinder the plant in the least. Simply clip these areas off and your ready to go. I also washing the tuber with water after you clip to get it nice and clean. Now you don’t need to lay the tendrils in any special way when planting. I made the hole big enough to fit them comfortably.  As I mentioned, this isn’t particular about soil but I would amend the soil a bit in cases where you have nothing but clay.  The inexpensive Evergreen brand found at Home Depot/Lowes is one of my favorites and can be had for a little over $1 a bag.  As with all newly planted perennials, be sure to water it on a regular basis at first when mother nature does not provide. Once established, it will not require much care. That being said, you do have to watch for aphids. Get rid of them by spraying organic insecticidal soap. I find that aphids are not a problem until later in the summer. When the plant fades in the fall, simply cut back to the ground.

The best time to plant this will be in the early spring so that you can enjoy your bright orange blooms come the summer.  The plant grows to about a foot or so high but it does branch out quite a bit so you want to give it some space. The diameter is probably twice the height. While you can use as a single specimen type plant, they really look great planted en mass.  Anyway, I really like and enjoy this plant and I think you will too!

Hardiness Zones: 3-9
Growing Difficulty: Easy
Sun exposure: Full Sun to Mostly Sunny
Height: 12″-18″
Width: 18″-24″ once mature
Bloom time: Late spring, early summer
Bloom Color: Bright Orange
Foliage Color:Green
Watering: Minimal and only during extended droughts
Soil: Average, normal, amended clay

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